Point Reyes National Seashore

I’m not exactly sure when my love for Point Reyes developed, whether it was when I first saw John Carpenter’s movie The Fog, or when I actually visited this breathtaking place but there’s one thing for sure: this love keeps bringing me back time and time again.

The iconic view you’ll see in the film.

The iconic view you’ll see in the film.

It may be due to its endless beauty or perhaps because it makes me feel like a child again. After all, this is the only place I know where you can walk up to a shipwreck, check out the inside of a maritime radio station and visit a historically significant lighthouse, along with rescue boathouses and all in a mere few hours?

The shipwreck on Tomales Bay is a great reminder of a more simple times.

The shipwreck on Tomales Bay is a great reminder of a more simple times.

At the end of the Cypress Tree Tunnel stands the KPH radio station, which played an important role in maritime communications for ships on the Pacific Ocean through the late 1900s.

At the end of the Cypress Tree Tunnel stands the KPH radio station, which played an important role in maritime communications for ships on the Pacific Ocean through the late 1900s.

Coming from the high deserts of Southern California, I enjoy the cool, coastal climate here and I love Point Reyes' mysteriously thick fog. Summer is its foggy season and the fog can be so thick and wet that you'll need a raincoat to stay warm and dry.   

The historic Point Reyes Lighthouse was built in 1870 to warn ships of the dangerous Headlands and as an aid to maritime navigation.

The historic Point Reyes Lighthouse was built in 1870 to warn ships of the dangerous Headlands and as an aid to maritime navigation.

In response to the many shipwrecks in the treacherous coastal waters, lifesaving stations were also established in the late 1800s and early 1900s.

In response to the many shipwrecks in the treacherous coastal waters, lifesaving stations were also established in the late 1800s and early 1900s.

Coexisting with tourists and park activities is the Seashore's pastoral zone, where the ranchers lease their land and continue the long tradition of dairying. I’ve seen the happiest cows here… I mean have you ever seen them chasing each other like dogs and wagging their tales? It’s the funniest, and most bizarre, sight ever.

Oh and let’s not forget about the wildlife! The Tule Elk and Elephant Seal are probably the main attraction at Point Reyes but I also enjoy watching birds frolicking, black-tail deer grazing on thick grass and the scheming coyotes hanging around.

Much of the peninsula's coastline is made up of rocky cliffs, though there are also expansive sandy beaches. Seeing the deep blue, cold water with perfectly bright white waves is always a visual treat.

Chimney Rock Trail and its jagged coastline.

Chimney Rock Trail and its jagged coastline.

The Point Reyes inlet is called Drakes Estero and it’s one of only two marine wilderness areas in the nation.

The Point Reyes inlet is called Drakes Estero and it’s one of only two marine wilderness areas in the nation.

From its thunderous ocean breakers crashing against rocky headlands and expansive sand beaches to its open grasslands, brushy hillsides, and forested ridges, Point Reyes awaits your exploration.

In Frame: Amanda Plum

This was my second time shooting with Amanda and it happened spontaneously, as kind of a last minute decision. In my opinion, having virtually no plan and a limited time to prepare presents the best circumstance for creating freely and without expectations. 

She's very professional and has plenty of input from wardrobe and make-up to poses and all kinds of intricate details, which allows me to deal with the technical aspects of the shoot and to try new things while also hitting all the basics.

Our shoots are always fun and productive, with a natural flow, and at the end Amanda is also great at helping me find the real gems in the stack of unique and interesting images. 

Amanda takes directions well, which made the above image one of my absolute favorites.

Time will tell, but I feel like there are more collaborations in our future...

What do you think of these shots? I'd love to hear from you, so please let me know in the comments below. Thank you!

Working with: CorePower

As part of Core Power's #UnleashYourAwesome campaign, I created a series of images about how I alternate my gym workouts with cardio on the beach.

I also showed, with the help of my friend Olgi, the importance of finding a quiet place where you can turn off the outside world.

Leading a healthy and stress-free life style can be achieved by disconnecting from the daily grind, exercising and developing good eating habits, which is where the protein rich Core Power drinks can help.

People and Places: Alaska

They say "it's the journey not the destination" and while I love the quote I also knew that the focus of my second trip to Alaska had to shift to its people. I love photographing beautiful places but I wanted to step out of my comfort zone in order to do something different. I ended striking up conversations with strangers so that I could persuade them to have their pictures taken. Here are the results of my scheming.

HATCHER PASS

A scenic 49-mile rugged mountain pass in the Mat-Su Valley named after Robert Hatcher, who was a miner and prospector. It was used during the Alaska gold rush of the 1930s/40s.

Currently it is a recreational playground which also includes the Independence Mine State Historic Park. You can stay at one of these red cabins as well for a more authentic experience.

Currently it is a recreational playground which also includes the Independence Mine State Historic Park. You can stay at one of these red cabins as well for a more authentic experience.

I found Frank on my way out of Hatcher Pass at one of those roadside gas station-convenience store combos. He's been working the cash register there for the past 15 years. Originally from Arizona, Frank took a two week vacation back in 1984 and 'forgot' to go back. (According to Frank, he got lost. Haha!) Frank was quiet and reserved at first but he turned out to be a real jokester once we started talking. I appreciated him for allowing me into his world... even if only for a few minutes.

I found Frank on my way out of Hatcher Pass at one of those roadside gas station-convenience store combos. He's been working the cash register there for the past 15 years. Originally from Arizona, Frank took a two week vacation back in 1984 and 'forgot' to go back. (According to Frank, he got lost. Haha!) Frank was quiet and reserved at first but he turned out to be a real jokester once we started talking. I appreciated him for allowing me into his world... even if only for a few minutes.

MATANUSKA GLACIER

At 27 miles long by 4 miles wide, Matanuska Glacier is the largest glacier accessible by car in the United States. After paying the entrance fee, travelers can drive up to and park next to the glacier.

Those seeking adventure can walk right up to and touch the 15,000 year old glacier. Matanuska Glacier is so massive that the water flowing out of its terminus forms the roaring Matanuska River.

Those seeking adventure can walk right up to and touch the 15,000 year old glacier. Matanuska Glacier is so massive that the water flowing out of its terminus forms the roaring Matanuska River.

Matanuska Glacier Park is privately owned and it is the glacier's only access point. Debbie's brother leases the place and she helps him run it. She's been doing it for almost twenty years now and has a profound appreciation for this amazing place. As soon as I paid the entry fee I started to ask questions and we had a great conversation about Alaska, nature and my road trip. She even let me take her picture. Debbie is a tough woman but she began to blush as soon as we stepped outside. I told her I wasn't comfortable taking these random portraits either but she didn't care. She just wanted to help me out, which I really loved about her and will never forget. I took four shots, gave her a goodbye hug and headed to the glacier.

Matanuska Glacier Park is privately owned and it is the glacier's only access point. Debbie's brother leases the place and she helps him run it. She's been doing it for almost twenty years now and has a profound appreciation for this amazing place. As soon as I paid the entry fee I started to ask questions and we had a great conversation about Alaska, nature and my road trip. She even let me take her picture. Debbie is a tough woman but she began to blush as soon as we stepped outside. I told her I wasn't comfortable taking these random portraits either but she didn't care. She just wanted to help me out, which I really loved about her and will never forget. I took four shots, gave her a goodbye hug and headed to the glacier.

GLENN HIGHWAY

Exploring along the Glenn you can learn a lot about Alaska's rich history, from the excitement of the gold rush days all the way back to the Native heritage of the first Alaskans

Roadhouses were originally built to provide amenities to traders and gold miners and there are still quite a few to be found along the Glenn Highway.

Roadhouses were originally built to provide amenities to traders and gold miners and there are still quite a few to be found along the Glenn Highway.

Ross and his wife own the Mendeltna Creek Lodge, built in 1930, and they also have one of the oldest gas pumps around. My tank was almost completely empty when I rolled in, so their overpriced fuel was a life saver for me. Ross was kind enough to pump while I snapped away, then we went inside the lodge. There was so much to see, smell and touch, it was ridiculous. For example... Sights: wooden everything, folk art, taxidermy, an old liquor bar and a rustic dining room. Smell: a cozy fireplace, coffee and bacon and eggs. Touch: taxidermy and furs. My favorite was the silky fur of a lynx which he wrapped around my neck (head included). I had so much fun and thanked Ross for showing me around. I bought some coffee and cut out but the memory of this cozy place will stay with me for a long time.

Ross and his wife own the Mendeltna Creek Lodge, built in 1930, and they also have one of the oldest gas pumps around. My tank was almost completely empty when I rolled in, so their overpriced fuel was a life saver for me. Ross was kind enough to pump while I snapped away, then we went inside the lodge. There was so much to see, smell and touch, it was ridiculous. For example... Sights: wooden everything, folk art, taxidermy, an old liquor bar and a rustic dining room. Smell: a cozy fireplace, coffee and bacon and eggs. Touch: taxidermy and furs. My favorite was the silky fur of a lynx which he wrapped around my neck (head included). I had so much fun and thanked Ross for showing me around. I bought some coffee and cut out but the memory of this cozy place will stay with me for a long time.

POTTER MARSH

The Potter Marsh Bird Sanctuary is a rest area for migratory birds and also a good place to watch for beavers, moose and bald eagles.

A 1550-foot boardwalk with interpretive signs and spotting scopes takes you into the marsh and up close to the wildlife.

A 1550-foot boardwalk with interpretive signs and spotting scopes takes you into the marsh and up close to the wildlife.

I was out on the deck when I heard this weird sound from a distance. I followed the sound and found Lori practicing on a twisted horn. I asked her if it was a "duck call", which made her laugh. I learned that the horn was gifted to her and that it was the first time she was able to make a sound with it. She was stoked. The birds? Not so much. I also learned about Lori's struggles. She had multiple sclerosis, an illness that had almost destroyed her and ended up costing her job, friends and even her family. She was in constant pain and bedridden for years until she decided to take charge of her own life. (she said it happened when she accepted God into her life) She moved to Anchorage and studied to be a minister at her new church, a roll she's been fulfilling for five years now. Today, Lori has a new family of friends and she's happy, loving life and feeling great! 

I was out on the deck when I heard this weird sound from a distance. I followed the sound and found Lori practicing on a twisted horn. I asked her if it was a "duck call", which made her laugh. I learned that the horn was gifted to her and that it was the first time she was able to make a sound with it. She was stoked. The birds? Not so much. I also learned about Lori's struggles. She had multiple sclerosis, an illness that had almost destroyed her and ended up costing her job, friends and even her family. She was in constant pain and bedridden for years until she decided to take charge of her own life. (she said it happened when she accepted God into her life) She moved to Anchorage and studied to be a minister at her new church, a roll she's been fulfilling for five years now. Today, Lori has a new family of friends and she's happy, loving life and feeling great! 

CROW PASS

Located in the Chugach Mountains, Crow Pass follows a portion of the original Iditarod Trail. It’s a 21-mile trail but the first few miles will lead you past some breathtaking scenery.

Along the way you’ll find glaciers, waterfalls, mine ruins, alpine lakes, ponds, wildlife and wild berries

Along the way you’ll find glaciers, waterfalls, mine ruins, alpine lakes, ponds, wildlife and wild berries

I met Steve and his dog, Tundra, about 5 miles up in the mountains. It was his day off so he took the long hike... mostly for his dog. (Steve constantly needs to come up with ways to tire off the energetic husky.) We shared some water as we took in the sights. I found out that Steve moved to Alaska from Arizona almost twenty years ago. He fell in love with the land and its people, something I can definitely relate to. His respect for Alaskans came through when, at one point in our conversation, he told me that "Alaskans are resilient and very deliberate people". Those must be essential qualities on a land where conditions are harsh and the concept of time is diluted between the winter and summer months... but I'm sure there is much more to it.

I met Steve and his dog, Tundra, about 5 miles up in the mountains. It was his day off so he took the long hike... mostly for his dog. (Steve constantly needs to come up with ways to tire off the energetic husky.) We shared some water as we took in the sights. I found out that Steve moved to Alaska from Arizona almost twenty years ago. He fell in love with the land and its people, something I can definitely relate to. His respect for Alaskans came through when, at one point in our conversation, he told me that "Alaskans are resilient and very deliberate people". Those must be essential qualities on a land where conditions are harsh and the concept of time is diluted between the winter and summer months... but I'm sure there is much more to it.

EXIT GLACIER

Located in the Kenai Fjords, Exit Glacier is a glacier derived from the Harding Icefield. The rapid retreat of the glacier (about 187 feet from 2013-14) highlights the effects of climate change and how it's affecting Alaska's coastal glaciers.

Due to the accelerated melt, the access route to the glacier's terminus is now frequently flooded. Large chunks have also cleaved away from the glacier's face, exposing a cave-like opening at the base of the terminus. Due to the flood, I was not able to reach reach the cave.

Due to the accelerated melt, the access route to the glacier's terminus is now frequently flooded. Large chunks have also cleaved away from the glacier's face, exposing a cave-like opening at the base of the terminus. Due to the flood, I was not able to reach reach the cave.

I found Cassandra and her mom at the glacier taking pictures of each other. It was their special mother-daughter weekend, celebrating her mom's recent weight-loss (over 100 lbs!) with a hike. I congratulated the mom for taking charge of her body and snapped a few pictures of them to commemorate their day. We ended up heading back to the trail together. At this point the sun had reached the glacier and the water was melting at a faster pace. Navigating our way out through the rushing meltwater and the frosty, wet rocks proved to be much more difficult than coming in.

I found Cassandra and her mom at the glacier taking pictures of each other. It was their special mother-daughter weekend, celebrating her mom's recent weight-loss (over 100 lbs!) with a hike. I congratulated the mom for taking charge of her body and snapped a few pictures of them to commemorate their day. We ended up heading back to the trail together. At this point the sun had reached the glacier and the water was melting at a faster pace. Navigating our way out through the rushing meltwater and the frosty, wet rocks proved to be much more difficult than coming in.

KNIK GLACIER

The Knik Glacier is one of the largest glaciers in south-central Alaska. It feeds the 25-mile long Knik River, which empties into the Knik Arm section of Cook Inlet. I didn't now that the glacier was a visitor attraction with several tour companies operating in the area.

 Visitors can view the glacier by air, all-terrain vehicle tour, by boat, or on a guided packrafting tour.

 Visitors can view the glacier by air, all-terrain vehicle tour, by boat, or on a guided packrafting tour.

So far, this has been the flight of my life and I have two friends and a bit of luck to thank for it. I was 180 miles away when my buddy Dmitry messaged me that I should text Jerome, who flies a small plane. The weather was iffy for flying but I texted Jerome and I immediately headed back to Anchorage with hopes for the best outcome. Halfway there I heard back from Jerome. His text said that the weather looked promising for flying but he was running late for a sunset fly. At the end, it all worked out and we were up in the air for over an hour. I had an unforgettable time and was able to capture a bunch of beautiful shots. It was very late and dark once we landed as we rushed to grab some dinner and I completely missed taking a portrait of my new friend. It won't happen next time around...

So far, this has been the flight of my life and I have two friends and a bit of luck to thank for it. I was 180 miles away when my buddy Dmitry messaged me that I should text Jerome, who flies a small plane. The weather was iffy for flying but I texted Jerome and I immediately headed back to Anchorage with hopes for the best outcome. Halfway there I heard back from Jerome. His text said that the weather looked promising for flying but he was running late for a sunset fly. At the end, it all worked out and we were up in the air for over an hour. I had an unforgettable time and was able to capture a bunch of beautiful shots. It was very late and dark once we landed as we rushed to grab some dinner and I completely missed taking a portrait of my new friend. It won't happen next time around...

Working with: ZAGG

I started my photographic journey with my iPhone and I ended up shooting with it for two years prior to getting a DSLR. I took a lot of chances and soon I realized that while the body of the phone could take a beating, the screen was quite sensitive. After a few screen replacements, I tried applying screen protectors but they didn't work out for me.

Fast forward to the present and I couldn't be happier with the quality of my new ZAGG 'InvisibleShield' screen protector. It's strong and durable, looks great and just as sensitive to the touch as the factory screen. I had to take it out for a spin to see what kind of trouble we could get into. 

I take my phone to places where I wouldn't take my camera.

I take my phone to places where I wouldn't take my camera.

Dropping my phone is no longer a concern.

Dropping my phone is no longer a concern.

Friday Evening in Malibu

You know it's a special day when you (after much planning) finally reconnect with a longtime friend, shoot a few portraits of her for business and for fun, while also grabbing some cool lifestyle images along the way.

Here are some of the highlight from the shoot with Olgi.

Stylish bungalow 

Stylish bungalow 

Grumpy cat

Grumpy cat

Why I don't trust cats... Savages

Why I don't trust cats... Savages

Working with: Line 39

Line 39 wanted to see lifestyle photos of my favorite weekend getaway, while also featuring a bottle of their wine in fun and adventurous settings. To me, nothing competes with a spontaneous trip up North and you don't even have to wait until the weekend to make it happen.

In Frame: Alana

As my girls grow older, it happens less and less that they agree to be photographed. I'm glad that my younger one let me shoot a few frames on our way home from school. 

I can still make her smile though...

I can still make her smile though...

Looks like we're done. Haha!

Looks like we're done. Haha!